Impact

A combined focus of action and research continually informs the development of Poutiria te Aroha.

I’ve learnt a lot about the development of the child’s brain and stages, which makes me look at the child at a different level. This module shows the Māori side of the children and parenting.

It’s lovely to be together, as a community all on different parts of a journey, doing it in different ways…
and yet with a common sense of social justice as a common heartbeat.

What I learned from you touched my humanity – the essence of me. You are the embodiment of it — your energy, your fierceness, and your eloquence.

An action research approach

Since the inception of the project, an 'action research' approach has been used to test ideas and understand the impact of
Poutiria te Aroha.

 

This involves a cyclic process of planning, action and reflection, whereby learning from each phase of work is applied to inform the next steps.

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Differences being made

The differences this mahi is making to whānau and community are:

  • Healing and building of relationships within whānau and communities

  • Parents having realistic expectations of children through greater knowledge of child and brain development

  • Insights into parenting and whānau models drawn from te ao Māori reaffirming identity and providing motivation, inspiration and guidance

  • Capacity for ongoing positive relationships through modelling and teaching an accessible process for nonviolent parenting founded on Māori concepts

  • An environment of respect that is protecting and nurturing of children andtheir needs

  • A more positive and healthy culture within whānau and community, so that children in turn grow up to be healthy members of communities – breaking the cycle of violence.

All research reports

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2019 Action Research Report

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2013 Action Research Report

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2018 Action Research Report

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2011 Action Research Report

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2014 Action Research Report